Your support has meaning

Tax-benefits for donors:

The donations to a PBO (ANBI) are always deductible from-and-up to a certain amount and can be periodic or incidental, in cash or in kind. In all cases a confirmation from the foundation (if certain formal formats are met) is sufficient to be entitled to the tax deduction.

Private donations: are deductible for income tax as from € 60,- till 10% of your annual income (“drempel inkomen”). A bank statement of your donation is sufficient for deduction.

Company donations: are deductible from profit tax up to 50% of the annual profit to a maximum of € 100.000,- a year. The Foundation will hand over a formal confirmation of the donation.

Note: the tax exemption goes for Dutch based entities. ANBI certification is a EU PBO, but tax exemptions outside of The Netherlands need to be checked in the Country from where the donation originates. Contact us about your interest, and we will work out the opportunities together.

Printscreen of the tax authority' site showing the registration of ScimPulse as ANBI recognized foundation.

About being an ANBI

The “ANBI status” is granted by the Dutch Tax-authorities after meeting the demands of the tax authorities.

Since January 1st 2014 these demands have become much more strict then they used to be. The reason why is that it can be seen as a reassurance that donations will truly go to the public benefit and donors will get tax advantages in return for their donation. In this way the government gives support to the greater good of PBO organizations. ScimPulse is awarded with this earmark retroactively from the day it was founded – 1st of May 2013 – on 30th of April 2014.

Further to proving the foundation is sustainable into the future, the Foundation had to meet strong demands into proving:

  • The institution is not a company with capital divided into shares, a cooperative, a mutual insurance society or another body that may issue participation certificates;
  • At least 90% of the institutions efforts must be focused on the general good. This is referred to as the 90% requirement;
  • The institution, and the people directly involved in it, must comply with the integrity requirements;
  • A Director or person determining the policy may not treat the institutions assets as personal assets. The assets must be segregated;
  • A PBO may not retain more assets than reasonably required for the working of the institution. For this reason the institutional assets and capitals must remain limited.
  • The directors’ remuneration must be restricted to an expense allowance or a capped attendance fee.
  • A PBO must possess an up-to-date policy plan.
  • The PBOs administrative costs must remain within reasonable proportion to its operational expenditure.
  • Funds remaining after the dissolution of the institution must be allocated to a general good objective identical to the institutions objective.
  • A PBO is governed by specific administrative obligations.